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Discover Your Why!

Throughout much of our lives we struggle with “what” we should do and “how” we should do it.  “What will I be when I grow up?” “How will I earn a living?” “What do I do now?”  

“How will I go on now that this change has happened in my life?” In this workshop, participants will work together to ask and answer a different question.  “Why?” Discovering your personal “why” will bring clarity and impact to everything you do because it will enable you to walk in and toward your purpose.  

Adapting the Simon Sinek process called Find Your Why, participants will take the journey to discover what makes them feel fulfilled and what drives their behavior when at our natural best.  

Date:  Tuesday, October 8, 2019

Time:   9:00AM – 5:00PM (8:30AM Registration)

Location:  Des Moines Pastoral Counseling Center Conference Room

Fee: $149 (Lunch included)

Facilitators:

Carla Cain

Carla is a pastor and trained End-of-Life Doula. Her current work is consulting with congregations on strategic planning, conflict transformation, church leadership and a focus on working with the dying. Carla discerned her call to ministry after spending 30 years in the corporate world where she was involved in business development, human resources and cultural transformation work. Carla has an expertise and passion for personal mastery that leads to living well and dying well.

 

Diane McClanahan, M.Div., B.S.N.

Diane McClanahan, Director of Leadership and Spiritual Life at the Des Moines Pastoral Counseling Center, holds a bachelor of science degree in nursing from Duke University and a master of divinity degree from Yale Divinity School. An ordained elder in the United Methodist Church, she has served congregations in Connecticut and Iowa. Diane is a spiritual director, clergy coach, church consultant and conflict mediator. Her interest is in providing spiritual and educational programs and consultation to assist spiritual leaders and their congregations to meet the needs of their communities.

Mastery or Misery: Dealing Effectively with Conflict in Congregations

About the Course

Conflict is a natural phenomenon when people come together.  Conflict can divide a congregation; it can be hurtful to individuals and stifle congregational operations if left unresolved.  Yet, there are ways to utilize conflict as an opportunity to learn and grow as in community. Resolved conflict provides a path toward a shared mission and purpose. 

Why not address the specific nature of the conflict?  Why not learn and utilize specific skills to move beyond the conflict and towards conciliation?  All of this to achieve a more thriving and productive congregation and enriched, healthier relationships. Our individual relationship with conflict can determine how we react to conflict and how we lead others through conflict. 

This class involves three different phases over a six month period.  The first phase is in a classroom setting. The second phase is a monthly peer group facilitated call and the third phase is another classroom setting.  All of this to learn, practice and incorporate new skills into our daily lives. 

Audience:  Clergy of all traditions

Why Take the Class

Conflict can deter productivity and derail the mission of the congregation.  Finding ways, developing skills and being engaged with a peer group can provide the means to a healthier congregation.  This class is education, skill building and experiential. You will be supported over the six month class by trained and experienced conflict transformational professionals. 

Course Objectives

  • The course is designed to understand how leading self is an important element to leading others that improves the opportunity for healthier congregations and more productive relationships.
  • We will learn about our own relationship with conflict and how this contributes to conflict in the congregation.
  • We will learn how to recognize the power involved in conflict and how it is counter-productive.
  • We will learn how to work with others in the congregation using more courage and compassion.
  • Peer groups will be established following the first class session to create continuity and be a resource for situations as we incorporate new skills into our daily practice.

Class Schedule

Phase 1: Thursday, October 24, 9:00AM-5:00PM and Friday, October 25, 9:00AM-4:00PM

Phase 2:  Monthly peer group video calls of 4-5 peers and a facilitator.

Phase 3:  Thursday, April 23, 2020, 9:00AM-5:00PM

Location:  TBA

Tuition:  $450

CEUs: Available upon request. Please email Diane McClanahan: dmcclanahan@dmpcc.org

Facilitators:

Carla Cain

Carla is a pastor and trained End-of-Life Doula. Her current work is consulting with congregations on strategic planning, conflict transformation, church leadership and a focus on working with the dying. Carla discerned her call to ministry after spending 30 years in the corporate world where she was involved in business development, human resources and cultural transformation work. Carla has an expertise and passion for personal mastery that leads to living well and dying well.

 

Diane McClanahan, M.Div., B.S.N.

Diane McClanahan, Director of Leadership and Spiritual Life at the Des Moines Pastoral Counseling Center, holds a bachelor of science degree in nursing from Duke University and a master of divinity degree from Yale Divinity School. An ordained elder in the United Methodist Church, she has served congregations in Connecticut and Iowa. Diane is a spiritual director, clergy coach, church consultant and conflict mediator. Her interest is in providing spiritual and educational programs and consultation to assist spiritual leaders and their congregations to meet the needs of their communities.

On the Brink: A Group for Ordained Religious Professionals Transitioning into Retirement

 

PROGRAM

 

 

Retiring from active religious and spiritual leadership evokes many emotions–dread, joy, fear, anxiety, excitement…Questions arise: “How will I find meaning and purpose?” “What is my call now?” “How do I adapt to all of the changes that aging brings?” “How do I share my spiritual gifts while maintaining healthy boundaries?”

Utilizing Parker Palmer’s book, “On the Brink of Everything:  Grace, Gravity and Getting Old”, clergy approaching retirement, or recently retired, will gather four times to support one another by exploring the existential challenges retirement brings.

AUDIENCE

 

Ordained religious professionals including rabbis, pastors, priests, imams and others who are considering their next stage of life
DATE / TIME

 

Wednesdays from 1:00-3:30PM  / Sept 25, 2019, Nov 13, 2019, March 11, 2020, April 29, 2020
COST

 

$200 for the full series of four sessions
LOCATION

 

Des Moines Pastoral Counseling Center Conference Room

FACILITATORS

Diane McClanahan, M.Div., B.S.N.

Diane McClanahan, Director of Leadership and Spiritual Life at the Des Moines Pastoral Counseling Center, holds a bachelor of science degree in nursing from Duke University and a master of divinity degree from Yale Divinity School. An ordained elder in the United Methodist Church, she has served congregations in Connecticut and Iowa. Diane is a spiritual director, clergy coach, church consultant and conflict mediator. Her interest is in providing spiritual and educational programs and consultation to assist spiritual leaders and their congregations to meet the needs of their communities.

Mark Minear, Ph.D.

Mark MinearMark Minear is a licensed psychologist. He is also a recorded minister with the Religious Society of Friends (Quaker). He received his B.A. in Religion and English from William Penn College, an M.A. in Church History from the Earlham School of Religion, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology from Ball State University.  Mark works with adults on a wide variety of issues: depression, anxiety including trauma, loss and grief, transitions and adjustments, and spiritual concerns. Theoretical approaches include logotherapy (meaning-making), cognitive-behavioral, family systems, and mindfulness therapies.  He also has background in working with a variety of churches, denominations, and faith traditions, as well as with individual clergy in need of support.

Look for the helpers

click image to read more from Jim’s blog

July 2019

“When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news,” Mister Rogers said to his television neighbors, “my mother would say to me, ‘Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping.’”

Can you tell I recently caught the documentary about Fred Rogers? It was telling that they offered the quote above toward the end of the film—wanting to make sure that was the message left on the viewer’s mind.

I have been doing a series on generosity and gratitude in my reflections this year and the message to “look for the helpers” certainly fits. When Rogers offered this sentiment, he directed his message to children. From a child’s eye, they ought to look for “grown ups” who might help them when challenged with difficult situations.

The Center is fortunate to have “helpers” on many levels. Certainly the clinicians and staff who work with COOL (Children Overcoming Obstacles of Life) who directly serve kids in need of help. As with all of our counselors, the work is challenging but incredibly rewarding as we support clients on the path to healing and renewed hope.

This month I’d like to highlight a different kind of helping: those who work on our development team. We are celebrating a new hire in that department, Laurie Sloterdyk. Laurie comes to us with a wealth of fundraising experience and is well known in the philanthropic community of Des Moines. As the Director of Development, she’ll be working with Terri Speirs, who has been promoted to Director of Community Relations.  Many others on our team, but especially Allison Peet and Paige Kennedy support these efforts. So much of this work is relational and, dare I say, helpful.

As one who has spent years working in development, I firmly believe that this relational work is all about helping. Certainly, our generous donors are helping our clients by sharing with us the precious resources of time, talent and treasure. Without our donors, we could not live out this important mission. What isn’t noticed or discussed as often is how contributing to the Center also helps those who give. Much of our time in relating to donors is listening to their life stories and considering how they want to make a difference with their gifts. Philanthropy is really about discerning purpose and directing that energy into mutually beneficial efforts. Generosity and gratitude are all about building community and experiencing the fullness of life. Keep this in mind should you receive a call from Terri, Laurie or me.

I am grateful to be surrounded by such a talented staff and supporters who help—and are helped—by sharing in our mission of hope and healing.

Jim

C.O.O.L. Volunteer Day!

  • Thursday, June 27, 2019
  • 9 – 11 a.m.
  • Coordinator: Dr. Shannon Welch-Groves, licensed psychologist
We are seeking five (or so) volunteers to help us shine up our C.O.O.L. therapeutic supplies.
Duties will include:
1. cleaning cupboards in waiting room and play room
2. cleaning, disinenfecting and sorting toys
4. making lists to order new toys to replace old broken toys
5. hand sewing DIY sandbox cover
6. organizing art supplies and making lists on needs
7. assembling toy hospital and organizing new Play Mobile items

Men and Mental Health

Mark: “The most notable bridge on the entire transcontinental Lincoln Highway is found in Tama!

Mark Minear, Ph.D., a psychologist at Des Moines Pastoral Counseling Center, went on sabbatical in the Spring of 2016. He wanted to walk the Old Lincoln Highway from river to river across the State of Iowa. His initial reasons included to fulfill a dream, get some exercise, contemplate, and experience a bit of Iowa history. Along the way, he met a lot of local people who shared food and stories. Family, friends, and others joined him on his walk. He communed with nature in ways not possible when driving. Local radio and television stations interviewed him and followed his progress. He had meaningful conversations with his walking stick. You can read his blog posts documenting his epic fourteen-day walk at www.dmpcc.org/walkwithmark.

Dr. Minear, inspired by Ellery Duke, the Center’s executive director at the time, and his bicycle ride across the U.S., decided to use his walk as a platform to increase awareness about mental health services for men and boys and to raise money for the Center’s Client Assistance Fund with an emphasis on uninsured and underinsured men and boys. He shared that 17% of men seek mental health services while 29% of women do so. In 2018 the Center’s clientele was 37.5%, 3/8, men and boys. So far in 2019, the demographic is 36% men and boys.

Dr. Minear originally became aware of and interested in the gender differences in mental health issues when he was in graduate school. He cited strong influence by the work of the late Royda Crose who wrote Why Women Live Longer Than Men and what men can learn from them. Dr. Crose divided the sections in her book to include aging, biology, health and wellness, physical health, mental health, social health, occupational health, spiritual and environmental health, and longevity. There are life choices men can make in taking care of themselves. When the book was published in 1997, men lived an average of approximately 73 years and women 79 years. Current life expectancy is 76.1 years for men and 81.1 years for women

In his blog post on April 24, 2016, Dr. Minear wrote “over six million men in the U.S. suffer from depression with, perhaps, half of these going undiagnosed.” Dr. Minear reported that, while more women attempt suicide, men are four times more likely to complete suicide. He stated that men at mid-life comprise the highest suicide rate. A 2016 report by the American Association of Suicidology indicated “in 2014, 2,421 African Americans died by suicide in the US. Of these, 1,946 were male (80.38%). The overall suicide rate per 100,000 was 5.46. … This was the first national study to show observe higher suicide rates for African Americans than for Caucasians in any age group.”

The well-known mid-life crisis can shatter a man’s life. Men evaluate their life and find their present circumstances deficient. They may have all the trappings of a successful life and still feel life or personal inadequacy. Some men in mid-life crisis end significant relationships, quit their job, relocate, or have illicit extramarital relationships. These abrupt life changes only add to the stress.

Men may mask the signs of depression with anger and aggression. Life stressors such as financial strain, grief in all areas of life, and loss of employment contribute to depression. Men with genetic predisposition toward depression or who have a major illness may be at a greater risk for developing depression. Chronic depression in all people can result from low levels of the neurotransmitter serotonin, necessitating the need for antidepressant medication. Men may shy away from medication because they fear being judged by pharmacy staff. So, they may self-medicate with alcohol or illicit drugs.

Dr. Minear stated that women pay more attention to their bodies than men. However, eating disorders such as anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating affect men as well. Men may become obsessed with calorie counting or working out at a gym. One report stated that men may obsess about “their muscles, skin, genitals, nose, or hair.”

Dr. Minear said men have fewer social supports than women. Boys are socialized to withhold tears, suppress most emotions, ignore their bodies, and rely on fortitude to get through problems. There is social stigma against men seeking mental health services which is viewed as a sign of weakness. While men and boys are discouraged against the display of most emotions, they are encouraged to express frustration, anger, and rage either explicitly or implicitly through stoic silence or making excuses for them when they are angry. He stated men’s anger can be intense and there’s a need to help them find healthy expression.

Royce White

Out of Dr. Minear’s raising awareness about men and boys and mental health, a group of colleagues formed and meets monthly. ”When Life Gives You a Full Court Press” was born out of those meetings. The 2019 two-day event, sponsored by The Center and Des Moines University (DMU) takes place Thursday, July 11, and Friday, July 12 at DMU. The speaker for Thursday’s free event, “Rebound with courage,” is former NBA player and Iowa State basketball star Royce White. White has been open about Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) and how it derailed his life. He has become an advocate for mental health treatment. Friday’s event, “Pivot to health,” features four break-out sessions, two facilitated by mental health professionals and two by medical professionals. Headliners Dr. David Vogel and Patrick Heath, MS, will discuss their research into mental health treatment for men and boys which keenly interests Dr. Minear. CMEs and CEUs are available for Friday’s workshops. Information about both segments of the event can be found at www.dmpcc.org/MEN.

GAD generally begins in adolescence or young adulthood. It is less common in men than in women. Estimates indicate approximately four million people suffer annually. It often travels with depression.

GAD is diagnosed by using blood and urine tests to rule out medical conditions. Trained professionals also use psychological assessments. The list of possible symptoms is long. They include excessive worry and anxiousness, easily startled, headaches and fatigue, and problems with concentration. For years, my experience with GAD went untreated. I often felt as though I would have a psychotic break. Two psychiatrists diagnosed me with and treated me for Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD). My current psychiatrist accurately diagnosed the GAD. Medication, counseling, and journaling are very effective in keeping me balanced.

GAD cannot be cured, and there are no quick fixes, but a number of treatment options may be used to mitigate symptoms. Any one of a variety of medications, taken orally, may be prescribed. Medications take several weeks to notice efficacy and your primary care physician or psychiatrist may need to try different ones to find the one that works best. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a talk therapy that helps build and strengthen coping skills. Lifestyle changes that may help are regular exercise, adequate sleep, healthy eating, and the avoidance of alcohol, recreational drugs, nicotine, and caffeine.

Dr. Minear hopes to open a pathway of communication between the medical and mental health communities. Greater awareness by the medical community of the need for mental health services for men and boys could lead to earlier detection and referrals.

We all can play a role in addressing the mental health needs of men and boys. Dr. Minear shared some tips:

  • Talk more openly and candidly about mental health and mental health treatment.
  • Erase stigma by treating mental illness as a viable topic rather than taboo.
  • Educate and engage medical providers.
  • Equip the medical community to make referrals.

Dr. Minear added that mental health should not be gender specific. Mental illness affects men, women, boys, and girls. We can learn as much as possible about men and mental health. We can be attentive to the signs of depression and anxiety shown by the men in our lives. We can be supportive and encouraging by listening. We can all benefit by showing sensitivity and compassion. The state of mental health services for men and boys is vital to stronger, healthier, and more resilient relationships which contributes to the well-being of everyone.

For more information about “When Life Gives You a Full Court Press,” visit the Center’s website at www.dmpcc.org/MEN or call Terri Speirs, 515-251-6670.

Breakout workshop topics and presenters

Morning breakout option 1: Examination of male psychology through superhero representations

Presenter: Dr. Mark Poeppe, Psy.D. / Licensed Psychologist / Des Moines Pastoral Counseling Center

Dr. Mark Poeppe, Psy.D., will be presenting on an examination of male psychology through an inspection of superhero representations in popular media.

Dr. Mark Poeppe

Mark Poeppe, Psy.D., is a licensed psychologist. Mark received his Bachelor’s of Science from the University of Iowa and his Master’s of Science and Doctorate of Clinical Psychology from the Wisconsin School of Professional Psychology. Mark provides psychotherapy to children, adolescents, and adults. He has special interest in the treatment of depression, anxiety, other mood-related difficulties, life transitions, chronic pain or illness, OCD, high-functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder, ADHD, severe and persistent mental illness, and working with adolescents and young adults. Mark approaches treatment through a multitheoretical lens that primarily incorporates cognitive-behavior therapy, dialectical behavior therapy, motivational interviewing and mindfulness techniques. In addition to therapy, Mark provides psychological assessment for all ages and neuropsychological assessment for adolescents, adults, and older adults.

Morning breakout option 2: topic tba

Presenter: Ken L. Cheyne, M.D. / Pediatrician / Blank Children’s Adolescent Clinic

Dr. Ken Cheyne

Afternoon breakout option 1: Postpartum mental health issues as they pertain to men

Presenter: Christine Young, L.I.S.W. P.M.H.-C. / Outpatient Mental Health Therapist / Broadlawns Medical Center

Christine will be presenting on postpartum mental health issues as they pertain to men, both directly, and as partners to women who experience postpartum issues.

Christine Young, LISW, PMH-C

Christine Young, LISW, PMH-C earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Sociology from Augustana College and a Masters of Social Work degree from Saint Ambrose University. She is a Licensed Independent Social Worker. Prior to joining Broadlawns she worked with adults at a Mental Health Clinic in Urbandale and with children/adolescents in an urban school setting.  She specializes in Eye Motion Desensitization Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy, Interpersonal Therapy, Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, Family Therapy, Postpartum Depression, Anxiety, OCD and Mindfulness.

 

 

Afternoon breakout option 2: Understanding pain as it relates to men’s mental and physical health

Presenter: Nick Maiers, P.T., D.P.T., CSMT, TPS 

Dr. Nick Maiers

Dr. Nick Maiers is Assistant Professor, Doctor of Physical Therapy Program at Des Moines University.

Royce White bio and photo

Royce White

Royce White is an humanitarian, author, creator, entrepreneur and professional athlete. He is currently the founder and CEO of Vitruvian, Inc. A science, technology and engineering company. White says Vitruvian’s initial focus is healthcare, food and water. Current projects include Anxious Minds, Inc. and Vardas Solutions, Inc. The goal of these two subsidiaries is advancing mental health care access and efficiency. White is also the founder of WING, Inc. A media and electronics company. It’s subsidiaries include The Last Renaissance & Just Another Talk Show.

Royce White was born in the Twin Cities, MN. He was an All-American athlete in both high school and college basketball before being drafted 16th overall in the 2012 NBA draft. Ahead of being drafted he spoke openly about being diagnosed with anxiety disorder or (GAD) as a teenager.

After being drafted, White publicly voiced concerns about the NBA having no concrete mental health policy. He advocated for a mental health reform within the NBA, all sports and the greater society. Since then he has not been on an NBA roster, even though he was likened to players such as Charles Barkley and LeBron James. Despite his absence from the NBA, it is clear that his advocacy has caused movement in the way the league is handling mental health. Recently NBA spokesperson Kathy Behrens stated that the NBA has great respect for White sharing his struggles and says that the league has a “growing understanding of the importance of the mental health subject.”

In May 2018, the National Basketball Players Association (NBPA) hired its first mental health director. Dr. William D. Parham credited White, amongst other players, as having been instrumental in moving the needle forward.

White says the need for sensible conversation and scientific problem solving is more paramount than any other time in known human history. White believes the human psychology must be the anchor of social progression.

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Conference schedule

7 a.m. – Optional breakfast

8 a.m. – Registration

8:30 – 10:15 a.m. – Plenary session I – ISU research presentation

10:15 – 10:30 a.m. – morning break

10:30 -11:45 – Breakout sessions I

11:45 a.m. – 12:45 a.m. – Lunch on your own (cafeteria will be open)

12:45 – 2 p.m. Breakout sessions II

2 – 2:15 p.m. – afternoon break

2:15 – 3:30 p.m. – Plenary session II – ISU research presentation  

3:30 – 4 p.m. – Plenary III – analysis – psychologists from the Des Moines Pastoral Counseling Center

4 p.m. end

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